Rotary Club of Norwood

Executive Board

Immediate Past President
Vice President / President Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Sergeant-At-Arms
Membership Chair
Public Relations Chair
Website / eBulletin Administration
Administration Chair
Finance / Fundraising Committee Chair
Assistant Secretary
Service Projects Chair
Rotary Foundation Chair
 

Message from our President

 
October 2014
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Speakers

Oct 29, 2014
Nov 12, 2014
Steve Albright Youth Exchange Inbound Chair
Board of Director's Meeting / Nominations for Next Year's Officers
Dec 03, 2014
Phil Salisbury Norwood Transcript & Bulletin
Board of Director's Meeting / Election of next year's officers
Dec 17, 2014
Jan 14, 2015
Business Meeting
Board of Director's Meeting
Jan 28, 2015
Feb 11, 2015
Business Meeting
Board of Director's Meeting
Feb 25, 2015
Mar 11, 2015
Business Meeting
Board of Director's Meeting
Mar 25, 2015
Apr 08, 2015
Business Meeting
Board of Director's Meeting
Apr 22, 2015
 
 

Club Sponsers

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Download the website sponsorship guide
 
 

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Club Information

Welcome to the Rotary Club of Norwood
. . . Chartered April Nineteenth, 1926 . . .

Norwood

Service Above Self

Wednesdays @ 6 PM
Byblos Restaurant
678 Washington Street
Norwood, MA  02062
United States
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District Site
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Bulletins
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Venue Map
 

To contact us:

rotarynorwoodma@gmail.com   *    P.O. Box 763 Norwood, MA 02062
 

Rotary Code of Conduct

 
Code of Conduct
 
As a Rotarian, I will
  1. Exemplify the core value of integrity in all behaviors and activities
  2. Use my vocational experience and talents to serve in Rotary
  3. Conduct all of my personal, business, and professional affairs ethically, encouraging and fostering high ethical standards as an example to others
  4. Be fair in all dealings with others and treat them with the respect due to them as fellow human beings
  5. Promote recognition and respect for all occupations which are useful to society
  6. Offer my vocational talents: to provide opportunities for young people, to work for the relief of the special needs of others, and to improve the quality of life in my community
  7. Honor the trust that Rotary and fellow Rotarians provide and not do anything that will bring disfavor or reflect adversely on Rotary of fellow Rotarians
  8. Not seek from a fellow Rotarian a privilege or advantage not normally accorded others in business or professional relationship
 
 
 
Meeting Dates for Remainder of Year
 
October 29    (Million Dollar Meal $10 Donation, Attendance Optional)
 
November 12
 
December 3    (Board of Directors Meeting)
 
December 17   (Christmas Party)
 
January 14      (Board of Directors Meeting)
 
January 28
 
February 11
 
February 25
 
March 11        (Board of Directors Meeting)
 
March 25
 
April 8
 
April 22
 
May 6            (Board of Directors Meeting)
 
May 20
 
June 3
 
June 17  (Installation Banquet / Citizen of the Year Award)
 
 
Any meeting canceled due to inclement weather will be announced via email to all members, before noon of meeting day.  
 
 
 

 
 
The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise, and in particular, to encourage and foster: ONE. The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service; SECOND. High ethical standards in business and professions, the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations and the dignifying of each Rotarian's occupation as an opportunity to serve society; THIRD. The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian's personal, business, and community life; FOURTH. The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service.
 

 
 
One of the most widely printed and quoted statements of business ethics in the world is the Rotary "4-Way Test."It was created by Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor in 1932 when he was asked to take charge of the Chicago-based Club Aluminum Company, which was facing bankruptcy. Taylor looked for a way to save the struggling company mired in depression-caused financial difficulties. He drew up a 24-word code of ethics for all employees to follow in their business and professional lives. The 4-Way Test became the guide for sales, production, advertising and all relations with dealers and customers, and the survival of the company was credited to this simple philosophy. Herb Taylor became President of Rotary International during 1954-1955. The 4-Way Test was adopted by Rotary in 1943 and has been translated into more than 100 languages and published in thousands of ways. The message should be known and followed by all Rotarians. "Of the things we think say or do: 1. Is it the TRUTH? 2. Is it FAIR to all concerned? 3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS? 4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?"
 
 

 

PolioPlus, the most ambitious program in Rotary's history, is the volunteer arm of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. For more than 25 years, Rotary has led the private sector in the global effort to rid the world of this crippling disease. Today, PolioPlus and its role in the initiative is recognized worldwide as a model of public-private cooperation in pursuit of a humanitarian goal.

 

  • To date, Rotary has contributed more than US$1 billion.
  • Rotary’s leadership, beginning in 1985, inspired the World Health Assembly to pass a resolution to eradicate polio, which paved the way for the formation of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative in 1988. 
  • Thousands of Rotarians around the world have volunteered during National Immunization Days to immunize children. 
  • The PolioPlus program helps Rotary fund operational costs, such as transportation, vaccine delivery, social mobilization, and training of health workers, and support surveillance activities.Read more about what happens before, during, and after a National Immunization Day (NID). 
  • Rotarians work to encourage both donor and polio-affected governments to commit the political and financial resources needed to eradicate polio.
  •  
 
 
 

August - Membership and Extension
September - New Generations
October - Vocational Service
November - Rotary Foundation
December - Family Life
January- Rotary Understanding
February - World Understanding
March - Literacy
April - Rotary Magazine
June - Fellowship

 

 
 
In addition to our web site, you can also find us on facebook.  Just click on the link in our Club Web Links Section on the right hand side of our Home page.
 

 
 

 Literacy is so important to Rotary International, that an entire month of the Rotary Year is devoted to focusing our attention on it.  In 1985, Rotary declared basic literacy to be a pre-condition to the development of peace. Through this organizational emphasis, more than half the world's 33,000 Rotary clubs address the full range of literacy and mathematical challenges for primary, vocational and adult learners as well as teacher training.

Many Rotary clubs, including the Norwood Rotary, promote what is termed "lighthouse" literacy projects those that can be replicated easily, thereby increasing the scope of their impact.Lighthouse literacy projects have been created for formal schooling, older children who are not in school, functionally illiterate adults (particularly women), special groups, and teacher's training. The purpose of these projects is to inspire, guide and support national authorities toward alleviating mass illiteracy in developing countries. In Thailand, for example, the "lighthouse" literacy effort has been so successful that the government adopted it as its national program. Similar literacy initiatives have been sponsored by Rotary clubs in Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, and South Africa.  Early literacy training is critical to the success of a child's later education. Rotarians work with children, parents and educators to encourage and build reading skills at an early age. Over 300 Rotary Clubs currently support the Dollywood Foundation's Imagination Library, which provides a book each month to children from birth to age five. For an annual cost of $ 28 per child the Dollywood Foundation sends children registered for the program one book a month, beginning with The Little Engine the Could. The books are age appropriate and range from life lessons to bedtime stories. The program also helps strengthen families by encouraging positive interaction between parents and children through shared reading. Today, Imagination Library serves 47 states, along with parts of Canada and the United Kingdom, and has provided children with more than 15 million books. For more information about Imagination Library, see the link at www.rotary.org
 
 
 
ImageThe world's first service club, the Rotary Club of Chicago was formed on February 23 1905 by Paul P. Harris, an attorney who wished to capture in a professional club the same friendly spirit he had felt in the small towns of his youth, with Gustavus Loehr, Silvester Schiele , and Hiram Shorey.The club's first constitution adopted in January 1906 makes no reference to gender, referring only to "persons". For the next seven decades the issue of women as members would be debated by Rotarians all over the world, including the members of the Rotary Club of Norwood which was formed just twenty years after the first Rotary Club, on April 19, 1926. 
In 1911 an all-women's Rotary Club was formed in Minneapolis and between 1911 and 1917 an all women's Rotary Club existed in Duluth, Minnesota alongside the men's club, which exists to this day as an all woman Rotary Club. In 1912, the Belfast, Northern Ireland club and The RI Duluth Convention discussed the admission of women but rejected the idea. This was to happen at every convention until 1921, when at the International Convention in Edinburgh, Scotland the Standard Club Constitution was produced in which Article 2, Section III stated "A Rotary Club shall be comprised of men.
  Shortly thereafter the wife of the Chicago Club President met with 59 other women to form "Women of Rotary". The Board of RI rejected that name so it was changed to "The Women of the Rotary Club of Chicago".  In England on May 15, 1923 the Manchester Club proposed "The Formation of a Ladies' Rotary Club in Manchester." The proposal was defeated, so instead the first Inner Wheel Club was formed.
It was not until after World War II when the status of women in western societies changed irrevocably as they filled occupations previously the domain of men when the men were called upon to serve in the armed forces, that the movement to include women in Rotary gained momentum. In 1950 an enactment to delete the word male from the Standard Rotary Club Constitution was proposed by a Rotary Club in India for the Council on Legislation. In 1964 an enactment proposed by a Rotary Club in Sri Lanka to permit the admission of women, and two others to allow women to be honorary members, were voted to be withdrawn.
In 1972 as more women began reaching higher positions in their professions, along with the growth of the feminist movement, more clubs began lobbying for female members. A US Rotary club proposed admitting women into Rotary at the 1972 Council on Legislation and with three separate proposals in 1977, when a Brazilian club also proposes to admit women as honorary members.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The Rote

The Rote Autumn 2014
Oct 18, 2014
 
 
 

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World Polio Day: Health officials laud polio eradication achievements, point to disease’s endgame
After a year of shrinking polio cases worldwide, the crippling disease is now on the cusp of being eradicated, said top health officials at Rotary's second annual World Polio Day event on 24 October. At a special Livestream program -- World Polio Day: Make History Today -- Rotary leaders joined global health experts and celebrity singers to hail the progress of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. After nearly 30 years, the GPEI, which includes Rotary, the World Health Organization, UNICEF, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is on...
Dynamic young club uses social media to grow
Erin Mills had just finished teaching for the day in Montevideo, Uruguay, when her smartphone buzzed with a message. An impromptu gathering to watch Uruguay's World Cup soccer match was being organized. Through the power of a mobile messaging app, a majority of the Rotary Club of Plaza Matriz had soon assembled at a member's home to munch on baked goods and chips while rooting for their national team. That enthusiasm and ability to draw a crowd has made the club, which just received its charter in July, a success in the country's capital city. Made up almost entirely of young professionals,...
Previewing the World Polio Day Livestream event
Rotary celebrates World Polio Day on 24 October with a Livestream event featuring expert speakers and celebrity performers. Hosted by Time magazine science and technology editor Jeffrey Kluger, the Chicago event also includes a global status update on the fight to end polio and the challenges that remain, as well as information about joining Rotary's historic campaign. The program, being held before a live audience at 18:30 Chicago time (UTC-5), includes a performance from Tessanne Chin, 2013 winner of the TV show "The Voice," an introductory message and videotaped performance by reggae star...
Creating works of art helps refugee children repair their lives
When asked to describe his future, a refugee child from Iraq draws a picture of himself as a doctor. Another child uses colorful paints to depict happy memories of his former life in Iraq. Both children are among the 200,000 displaced Iraqis who now live in Jordan, a country that has become a safe haven for those fleeing oppression and war in neighboring Palestine, Syria, and Iraq. Alexandra Dawley, a former volunteer with the Collateral Repair Project in Jordan, emphasizes how something as simple as an art project can help young refugees adjust to their new lives in a foreign country. With...
Chat with food experts on Twitter about alleviating hunger
Hunger affects more than 800 million people worldwide, according to the United Nations' World Food Programme, and one-third of all the food grown every year goes to waste. Together, we can change that. On World Food Day, Thursday, 16 October, join a conversation on Twitter from 12:00 to 13:00 Chicago time (UTC-5), using the hashtag #RotaryHunger. During the chat, food experts will talk about ways to alleviate hunger and malnutrition in your community and around the world. Rotary (@Rotary) will moderate the chat, and experts from organizations including Rotary First Harvest (@RFHarvest), the...
 
 
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